Betrayal at Little Gibraltar: A German Fortress, a Treacherous American General, and the Battle to End World War I

For succulent results every time nothing is more crucial in barbecuing and grilling than understanding the science behind the interaction of fire and food In this book Meathead Goldwyn pitmaster national barbecue cookoff judge and curator of theworlds most popular barbecue website amazingribs com debunks the myths that stand in the way of perfect outcomes Along the way he reveals all the secrets every successful griller needs to know from which wood chips to use to which equipment to choose Lavishly illustrated with full-color photos and line drawings The Science of Great Barbecuing and Grilling contains sure-fire recipes for traditional American favorites Tennessee Hollerin Sauce Last Meal Ribs Baltimore Pit Beef Simon and Garfunkel Chicken Schmancy Smoked Salmon hot dogs hamburgers grilled pizzas vegetables and much more-

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3 Responses to Betrayal at Little Gibraltar: A German Fortress, a Treacherous American General, and the Battle to End World War I

  1. Anonymous says:

    Read for the narrative, not the conclusions. The author clearly has an ax to grind, following the views of some of the participants. But blaming General Bullard (versus his Chief of Staff) is to me a bit too far. A lot of the problems are due less to deliberate malfeasance and more to the substantial American inexperience with managing large battlefields. That’s true of both commanders and particularly staff officers. A much more balanced account of the battle appears in “With Their Bare Hands”…

  2. Anonymous says:

    For a baby boomer like myself, it’s a harsh lesson on what war … Walker’s work is special on many levels. For a baby boomer like myself, it’s a harsh lesson on what war was like before the advent of drones and long-range weapons. It was a brutal but yet unquestioned challenge for a group of men to defeat another group of men, no matter what advantages either side had. The author’s thorough research put’s you in the place of many of the people who participated in what was hoped to be a several day victory but turned out to be a month and a half stalemate…

  3. Anonymous says:

    My Grandfather was there My grandfather was a pfc artillery observer in WWI. Per a note he left in a book about the war in the late 60s, he was on Montfaucon on the day it fell, 9/27/18. No one in the family, including myself and his still-living son & daughter – my mother – remembered him ever speaking about the events detailed here. The reasons have just become evident to me; the scars he carried were more than the mustard gas damage to his lungs. I’ve read lots and lots of history over the years. This is an…